Cataract / Lens Implant Educational Videos

Cataract / Lens Implant Educational Videos

Dr. Chang is considered an authority in the field of "Refractive Intraocular Lenses (IOLs)". To help educate patients about this topic, Dr. Chang wrote the scripts and collaborated with Eyemaginations to develop a series of patient educational videos. Called the “Chang IOL Modules”, these videos are marketed through Eyemaginations and are used by physicians around the Dr. Chang donates his royalties to the humanitarian cataract charities – Project Vision and Himalayan Cataract Project.

Educational Videos

Dr. Chang In the News

Dr. Chang In the News

Within ophthalmology, Dr Chang is widely considered one of the leading cataract surgeons, educators, and clinical investigators in the world. In this capacity, he has often been selected by medical associations to respond to media requests for information.

Dr. Chang In the News

Humanitarian Cataract Surgery

Humanitarian Cataract Surgery

Although curable with surgery, cataracts remain the leading cause of blindness in the world, accounting for more than one half of all blindness. Dr. Chang has used his international prominence to highlight and advance several important cataract efforts. He has traveled to many developing countries to perform and teach cataract surgery to local ophthalmologists.

Humanitarian Cataract Surgery

Flomax & Cataract Surgery

Flomax & Cataract Surgery

The intraoperative floppy iris syndrome was first reported by Drs. David Chang and John Campbell in 2005. This major discovery showed that the most common prostate medications (such as Flomax) cause iris problems during cataract surgery that can lead to many complications if the surgeon does not anticipate them. Dr. Chang has done extensive clinical research and is considered one of the world authorities on how to avoid and manage these problems.

Flomax & Cataract Surgery

Instruments By Dr. Chang

Surgical Instrumentation & Protocols

Dr. Chang's Instrument Set:

 Chang Hydrodissection Cannula 27-gauge
Katena K 7-5464 Short tip Katena 800-225-1195
Katena K 7-5466 Long tip recommended for first-time user)
Mastel 800-657-8057
ASICO 630-986-8032 #AE-7638
Oasis Medical 800-528-9786 (Disposable) #4036 J
Rhein 800-637-4346 #91-8032

Chang Combination Chopper (horizontal microfinger chopper & sharpened vertical chopper)
Katena K3-2369 (to be held in left hand) [K3-2368 held in right hand]
Katena K3-2377 – Chang horizontal microfinger chopper only
ASICO 630-986-8032 #AE-2573
Stronger Medical Instruments (Titanium version) 408-776-3722

Chang-Seibel Combination Chopper (Chang horizontal + Seibel vertical) held in left hand
Katena K3-2341  
Rhein 8-14564-R  

Chang Contingency Kit (Katena) Katena 800-225-1195
21 G Bimanual Aspiration Handpiece Katena K7-5811
21 G Bimanual Irrigation Handpiece Katena K7-5840
22G Infusion Cannula, self-retaining Katena K7-6711
Simcoe Irrigating Lens loop Katena K7-5530 (R-handed surgeon)
Corbin Sub-Tenon’s cannula Katena K7-4008
Castroviejo Corneal Scissors Katena K4-2220

Packer Chang IOL Cutter 19G DFH-0012 Microsurgical technologies 888-279-3323
Use with Duet handles, Ahmed Micro-Grasper DFH-0011

Chang Standard Cataract Instrument Set
Adult Nasal Lid Speculum (locking) [# 99-122] Pelion Surgical 866-701-2797
23G Graether irrigating collar button Katena K3 4930
Fine Thornton 13 mm fixation ring Katena K3 6161
Uthoff-Gills Scissors (capsule) Katena K4-5126
Masket Capsulorrhexis Forceps Katena K5-5084
Lester angled IOL Manipulator Katena K3-2690

Diamond Blades Acutome 800-979-2020
2.5 / 3.0 Simplicity trapezoid keratome – ask for Chang specifications
Lancet 1mm side port blade AK6175
Rubenstein AK 1.0 mm blade (preset 600 micron) AK6175P
Special devices and instruments
Mackool capsule retractors (disposable) FCI Ophthalmics 800-932-4202
9-0 Prolene double armed, straight needle (x2) FCI Ophthalmics
Cionni CTR & Ahmed capsule tensions segment FCI Ophthalmics
4-0 Prolene iris retractors (autoclavable) Katena K3-4970 (Also, Oasis and FCI)
Malyugin Ring Microsurgical technologies 888-279-3323
Incision Gauge Capitol Instruments #2000-01 206-271-3756
Vision Blue Dye DORC 800-753-8824
Dewey Tip Microsurgical technologies
Duet handles – micro forceps/scissors Microsurgical technologies

Preoperative Medication - Lidocaine gel slurry
Mix the following in a sterile plastic cup with a sterile tongue blade:
Lidocaine 2% jelly 8 ml
Mydriacyl 1% 20 gtts
Phenylephrine 10% 10 gtts
Acular or Nevenac 10 gtts
Zymar or Vigamox 10 gtts

  1. First place the eye drops in the cup; add the jelly and then mix.
  2. Draw the slurry into a 12 cc syringe
  3. Following Mydriacyl 1% one drop + Neosynephrine 2.5% one drop, place 1-2 drops of slurry into the eye and tape shut

Vancomycin Mixture (Dr. Howard Gimbel’s regimen) 0.1 ml = 1 mg.

  1. From the BSS bottle, withdraw 18 ml BSS into a 20 ml syringe.
  2. Inject 10 ml BSS into the 500 mg. Vancomycin vial to reconstitute.
  3. From the reconstituted Vancomycin vial, withdraw 2 ml of Vancomycin into a 3 ml syringe. Add this to the remaining 8 ml of BSS in the 20 ml syringe (making a total of 10 ml).
  4. Add 0.5 ml of Miostat to the 20 ml syringe, making a total of 10.5 ml of fluid.
  5. Use the #20 filtered needle to dispense the mixture. Scrub nurse is given 0.3 ml of the Vanco mixture in a TB syringe. Surgeon injects 0.1 ml into the eye.

 

David F. Chang, MD is a Summa Cum Laude graduate of Harvard College and earned his M.D. at Harvard Medical School. He completed his ophthalmology residency at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) where he is now a clinical professor. Dr. Chang is serving a 5-year term as chairman of the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) Annual Meeting Program Committee, having previously chaired the Cataract Program Sub-committee.

Dr. Chang's CV

Learn about Dr. Chang’s colaboration with Eyemaginations’ development of 3D eye animations


© Copyright 2013, David F. Chang, MD. All Rights Reserved.
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The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider.
By David F. Chang.